Orthopedics

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Rotator Cuff Tendinopathy

Every year, at least one million people experience a tear in their supraspinatus tendon, located within their rotator cuff. This is by far the most common orthopedic shoulder injury, and it results in shoulder pain and sometimes an occupational disability. This condition occurs frequently among elderly people, as well as middle-aged patients who are actively involved in athletics that require a frequent overhead movement of their arms and shoulders.

Current treatment options

A significant number of rotator cuff tendinopathy patients undergo surgery or nonsurgical treatment, to relieve the pain that rotator cuff tendinopathy causes and to increase the functioning of their rotator cuff and achieve tendon-to-bone healing. Surgical treatment allows repair within an open or arthroscopic procedure. But a recent meta-analysis indicates that these operative techniques may not offer future potential to heal tissue better or improve clinical results [8].

InGeneron’s solution

Doctors who treat rotator cuff tendinopathy patients in our clinical trial remove adipose tissue under local anesthesia from the patient’s abdominal area; isolate the Adipose-Derived Regenerative Cells from the sample using our centrifuge and an enzyme; and then wash, filter, and inject the cells into that same patient’s shoulder. The procedure is performed in the clinic on an outpatient basis and generally takes only two hours, start to finish.

For Doctors

Laboratory experiments show promise that this therapy will provide a safe, efficient, and effective way for doctors to repair rotator cuff tears [9-11].

For Patients

The procedure is a one-time, minimally invasive outpatient therapy designed to restore shoulder function and minimize pain.

Clinical Trial Status

Click here for the clinical trial status of our rotator cuff tendinopathy therapy.
Click here for a regulatory trial status via the ClinicalTrials.gov website.

 


 

Facet Joint Syndrome

At least two and a half million people endure chronic back pain, and facet joint syndrome is the leading cause. Facet joint syndrome is associated with the inflammation of a person’s facet joint, which leads to degeneration and cartilage loss. This condition causes chronic back pain – the major symptom of facet joint syndrome.

Current treatment options

Many current treatment options to address facet joint syndrome – such as oral pain medication, steroid injection, and nerve ablation – focus on its symptoms rather than its root cause, and therefore provide only short-term relief rather than healing. Spinal fusion, a procedure to repair the problem, involves major surgery.

InGeneron’s solution

We are conducting an FDA-approved feasibility study to investigate the use of ADRCs as a therapeutic treatment for facet joint syndrome that potentially provides an alternative to major surgery and current treatment options.

Clinical Trial Status

Click here for the clinical trial status of our facet joint syndrome therapy.
Click here for a regulatory trial status via the ClinicalTrials.gov website.


 

Wrist Osteoarthritis

Each year, at least 100,000 people who develop wrist osteoarthritis need an alternative to surgery to treat their ailment. Wrist osteoarthritis can result in bone spurs and bone cysts in the wrist, as well as a degeneration of cartilage. These conditions can cause inflammation and pain, and can lead to a reduction in grip strength and limited range of motion.

Current treatment options

There are presently nonsurgical and surgical interventions to address wrist osteoarthritis, but these options sometimes do not offer long-term pain relief or a significant improvement in grip strength. Surgical treatments are highly invasive.

InGeneron’s solution

We are conducting an FDA-approved feasibility study to investigate the use of ADRCs as a therapeutic treatment for wrist osteoarthritis that potentially provides a better option for patients.

Clinical Trial Status

Click here for the clinical trial status of our wrist osteoarthritis therapy.
Click here for a regulatory trial status via the ClinicalTrials.gov website.